Airport security to include face and iris-scanning fish in virtual aquarium tunnel

It’s going to get freaky futuristic at the airport, if you are in Dubai that is, with biometric-scanning Smart Tunnels for passport control and Tesla rides which weigh your luggage and deliver boarding passes.

Starting in 2018 at the Dubai International Airport’s Terminal 3, passengers will no longer need to stop at any security clearance counter to show their passports. Instead, travelers will pass through a first-of-its-kind biometric tunnel equipped with 80 face and iris scanning cameras hidden behind an immersive aquarium video. Details about the Smart Tunnel were revealed during the five-day Gulf Information Technology Exhibition (GITEX) Technology week.

“It is the first of its kind in the world and it’s a biometric system that allows passengers to simply walk through the tunnel without doing anything,” Major Khalid Al Felasi, Assistant General Director of Smart Services in GDRFA-Dubai, told Gulf News. “They don’t even need to show their passport. It works on face recognition technology and the passenger can finish entry procedure within 15 seconds.”

Although the Smart Tunnel can display any number of videos, such as horses running through the desert, a flowered path surrounded by skyscrapers, or even advertisements, the virtual reality tunnel in Dubai airport will display an aquarium similar to the walk-through tunnels at large tourist-attraction aquariums.

“The fish is a sort of entertainment and something new for the traveler but, at the end of the day, it attracts the vision of the travelers to different corners in the tunnel for the cameras to capture his/her face print,” explained Major Gen. Obaid Al Hameeri, deputy director general of Dubai residency and foreign affairs. “The virtual images are of very high quality and gives a simulation of a real-life aquarium.”

At the start of the tunnel, a person is to stand and look up at the iris-scan camera before proceeding through. While the curved ceiling and sides will display the aquarium, the digital floorboard will first display the color red which changes to green as the procedure finishes approving that traveler. The total time from start to finish is between 10 to 15 seconds. Not that I love all the biometric scanning, but just try to get through a TSA line in 15 seconds!

The National reported, “At the end of the tunnel, if the traveler is already registered, they will either receive a green message that says ‘have a nice trip’ or, if the person is wanted for some reason, a red sign will alert the operations room to interfere.”

As for that registration, travelers are to first register their face scan at a kiosk. But the kiosks in airports are not the only way to register as it can also be done via smartphone during a Tesla ride to the airport.”

Major Felasi told Gulf News that “the project will include Tesla electric cars to ferry passengers to the airport and that passengers would be able to register their details during the trip to the airport.” He added, “The car will collect passengers’ information, including the weight of the luggage, on the way to the airport and will deliver boarding pass in the car itself. It is all done by the smartphone.”

After arriving at the airport, “the luggage automatically goes through a smart system without the need to carry it through. The passenger can then proceed through the smart tunnel to finish passport control procedures in a few seconds.”

These are a few of the new security measures adopted by Dubai International Airport to combat terrorism; another involves Chinese-made explosive detection scanners which reportedly can “detect a wider range of explosive materials.” Additional Smart Tunnels are to be deployed at other terminals after the one at Terminal 3 launches by the end of the summer 2018. By 2020, over 124 million travelers are expected to pass through Dubai airports.

The video below downplays the number the biometric scanning cameras, mentioning only “more than 10 cameras,” while The National reported the tunnel will have about 80 cameras, with iris scanners to be added in the future.

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Airport security to include face and iris-scanning fish in virtual aquarium tunnel

It’s going to get freaky futuristic at the airport, if you are in Dubai that is, with biometric-scanning Smart Tunnels for passport control and Tesla rides which weigh your luggage and deliver boarding passes.

Starting in 2018 at the Dubai International Airport’s Terminal 3, passengers will no longer need to stop at any security clearance counter to show their passports. Instead, travelers will pass through a first-of-its-kind biometric tunnel equipped with 80 face and iris scanning cameras hidden behind an immersive aquarium video. Details about the Smart Tunnel were revealed during the five-day Gulf Information Technology Exhibition (GITEX) Technology week.

“It is the first of its kind in the world and it’s a biometric system that allows passengers to simply walk through the tunnel without doing anything,” Major Khalid Al Felasi, Assistant General Director of Smart Services in GDRFA-Dubai, told Gulf News. “They don’t even need to show their passport. It works on face recognition technology and the passenger can finish entry procedure within 15 seconds.”

Although the Smart Tunnel can display any number of videos, such as horses running through the desert, a flowered path surrounded by skyscrapers, or even advertisements, the virtual reality tunnel in Dubai airport will display an aquarium similar to the walk-through tunnels at large tourist-attraction aquariums.

“The fish is a sort of entertainment and something new for the traveler but, at the end of the day, it attracts the vision of the travelers to different corners in the tunnel for the cameras to capture his/her face print,” explained Major Gen. Obaid Al Hameeri, deputy director general of Dubai residency and foreign affairs. “The virtual images are of very high quality and gives a simulation of a real-life aquarium.”

At the start of the tunnel, a person is to stand and look up at the iris-scan camera before proceeding through. While the curved ceiling and sides will display the aquarium, the digital floorboard will first display the color red which changes to green as the procedure finishes approving that traveler. The total time from start to finish is between 10 to 15 seconds. Not that I love all the biometric scanning, but just try to get through a TSA line in 15 seconds!

The National reported, “At the end of the tunnel, if the traveler is already registered, they will either receive a green message that says ‘have a nice trip’ or, if the person is wanted for some reason, a red sign will alert the operations room to interfere.”

As for that registration, travelers are to first register their face scan at a kiosk. But the kiosks in airports are not the only way to register as it can also be done via smartphone during a Tesla ride to the airport.”

Major Felasi told Gulf News that “the project will include Tesla electric cars to ferry passengers to the airport and that passengers would be able to register their details during the trip to the airport.” He added, “The car will collect passengers’ information, including the weight of the luggage, on the way to the airport and will deliver boarding pass in the car itself. It is all done by the smartphone.”

After arriving at the airport, “the luggage automatically goes through a smart system without the need to carry it through. The passenger can then proceed through the smart tunnel to finish passport control procedures in a few seconds.”

These are a few of the new security measures adopted by Dubai International Airport to combat terrorism; another involves Chinese-made explosive detection scanners which reportedly can “detect a wider range of explosive materials.” Additional Smart Tunnels are to be deployed at other terminals after the one at Terminal 3 launches by the end of the summer 2018. By 2020, over 124 million travelers are expected to pass through Dubai airports.

The video below downplays the number the biometric scanning cameras, mentioning only “more than 10 cameras,” while The National reported the tunnel will have about 80 cameras, with iris scanners to be added in the future.

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Kings halt scoreless power play streak in win over Buffalo

  • Buffalo Sabres center Zemgus Girgensons (28) scores on Los Angeles Kings goalie Jonathan Quick (32) during the first period of an NHL hockey game in Los Angeles Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

    Buffalo Sabres center Zemgus Girgensons (28) scores on Los Angeles Kings goalie Jonathan Quick (32) during the first period of an NHL hockey game in Los Angeles Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

  • Buffalo Sabres center Jack Eichel (15) advances the puck as Los Angeles Kings center Nick Shore (21) pursues during the first period of an NHL hockey game in Los Angeles on Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

    Buffalo Sabres center Jack Eichel (15) advances the puck as Los Angeles Kings center Nick Shore (21) pursues during the first period of an NHL hockey game in Los Angeles on Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

  • Buffalo Sabres center Sam Reinhart (23) gets tangled with Los Angeles Kings goalie Jonathan Quick (32) during the first period of an NHL hockey game in Los Angeles on Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

    Buffalo Sabres center Sam Reinhart (23) gets tangled with Los Angeles Kings goalie Jonathan Quick (32) during the first period of an NHL hockey game in Los Angeles on Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

  • Buffalo Sabres center Sam Reinhart (23) moves in as Los Angeles Kings goalie Jonathan Quick deflects the puck during the first period of an NHL hockey game in Los Angeles on Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

    Buffalo Sabres center Sam Reinhart (23) moves in as Los Angeles Kings goalie Jonathan Quick deflects the puck during the first period of an NHL hockey game in Los Angeles on Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

  • Buffalo Sabres defenseman Jake McCabe (19) and Los Angeles Kings left winger Andy Andreoff (15) tussle briefly during the second period of an NHL hockey game in Los Angeles on Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

    Buffalo Sabres defenseman Jake McCabe (19) and Los Angeles Kings left winger Andy Andreoff (15) tussle briefly during the second period of an NHL hockey game in Los Angeles on Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

  • Buffalo Sabres center Zemgus Girgensons (28) and Los Angeles Kings center Tyler Toffoli (73) tangle during the second period of an NHL hockey game in Los Angeles on Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

    Buffalo Sabres center Zemgus Girgensons (28) and Los Angeles Kings center Tyler Toffoli (73) tangle during the second period of an NHL hockey game in Los Angeles on Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

  • Los Angeles Kings right winger Dustin Brown (23) slips the puck behind Buffalo Sabres Robin Lehner (40) for a goal during the second period of an NHL hockey game in Los Angeles on Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

    Los Angeles Kings right winger Dustin Brown (23) slips the puck behind Buffalo Sabres Robin Lehner (40) for a goal during the second period of an NHL hockey game in Los Angeles on Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

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LOS ANGELES – Both the Kings and the Sabres snapped streaks Saturday night.

Buffalo’s scoring drought at Staples Center had surpassed seven years by the time the Sabres brought it to a merciless end in the first period.

But the Kings not only halted their 0-for-16 streak on the power play this season, they started a roll in the opposite direction with three goals on the man advantage in three opportunities on their way to a 4-2 win, their third victory in four games this season.

Dustin Brown’s second-period goal officially ended the power play struggles and gave the forward four goals in four games.

Tyler Toffoli scored in the third period to give the Kings a lead for less than two minutes before Buffalo tied the game.

But Drew Doughty’s one-timer with two minutes to play put the Kings back in front before an empty-net goal, the lone Kings’ scoring effort not on the power play, sealed the game.

Buffalo defied its recent history by getting on the board first when Jack Eichel and Zemgus Girgensons perfectly executed a two-on-one late in the third period to halt the team’s scoring drought in Staples Center at 279 minutes and 38 seconds.

When Eichel got past Kings defenseman Jake Muzzin and slipped a pass by Alec Martinez with 4:15 left in the first period, Girgensons scored the first Buffalo goal in Los Angeles in more than seven years for a 1-0 Sabres lead.

The Sabres had been shut out in their previous three trips Staples Center before Saturday and are 0-5-1 in their last six games in the Kings’ building.

The Kings tied the game by scoring their first power play goal of the season when Dustin Brown swept a rebound inside the post just before Sabres goalie Robin Lehner could close off the tight window.

Jeff Carter’s attempt to put home the first rebound of Drew Doughty’s shot from the left side ricocheted toward Brown, who scored his fourth goal of the season in the Kings’ fourth game and ended the season-opening 0-for-16 streak on the man advantage 7:42 into the second period.

After scoring in his third consecutive game, Brown had accounted for 40 percent of the Kings’ goals to that point in the season. The 32-year-old winger scored 14 goals last season, his highest total in four years, but he is on pace to surpass his career-high 33 from a decade earlier.

Jonathan Quick highlighted his solid performance with a lunging stick save on a Buffalo power play early in the third period, a save that looked all that much more important when the Kings’ took the lead less than two minutes later.

The Kings’ drought on the power play brought on a deluge Saturday night. Tyler Toffoli scored the Kings’ second goal of the night in the team’s second opportunity on the man advantage.

With the second power play unit in, Muzzin found Toffoli alone in the middle of the ice, where he lifted a wrist shot into the top corner for a 2-1 lead 7:09 into the third period.

The lead lasted for less than two minutes before Buffalo’s Eichel put in his own rebound after Quick made a pad save on his first shot. The man largely responsible for Buffalo’s first goal gathered the rebound and cut across the crease to navigate his second shot around Quick’s pad to tie the game, 2-2.

Martinez looked rusty in his first game of the season, taking a pair of big hits that put him on his back in the first period.

Scoring chances don’t present themselves much better than his unguarded second-period opportunity from 15 feet in front of the net, but Martinez struggled to gather the puck and his shot that appeared to be sailing wide was gloved by Lehner.

Clippers’ Wesley Johnson benefits from an offseason confidence boost

LOS ANGELES — It isn’t about form. It’s about confidence. Catch it, jump, shoot it. If you think the basketball will go in the basket, then it probably will. If you think it won’t, then it probably won’t. Doubts can ruin a perfectly good jump shot, according to Clippers forward Wesley Johnson.

When he sank all four of his 3-point attempts, and 6 of 8 shots overall, during the Clippers’ exhibition victory Thursday over the Sacramento Kings at Staples Center, it wasn’t about tweaking his release or jumping higher or lower or finding a special spot on the floor.

The difference was a renewed sense of confidence that began during the offseason.

“That’s all it was,” Johnson said after scoring 16 points and taking five rebounds in a team-leading 31 minutes, in the Clippers’ 104-87 victory. “I’m just shooting it and I think I’m going to make every shot I shoot. They tell me to shoot every time I’m open. I’m letting it go.”

Johnson, starting his third season with the Clippers, is averaging 10.5 points on 72.7 percent shooting (16 for 22) in four exhibitions, including two starts in place of injured small forward Danilo Gallinari. Johnson has made eight of nine shots from beyond the 3-point arc (88.9 percent).

Gallinari didn’t play in the Clippers’ exhibition finale Friday against the Lakers because of a sprained left foot, giving Johnson another opportunity to show Doc Rivers and the coaching staff that he can produce if given sufficient playing time.

A lack of consistency has been an issue in the past, according to Rivers. Johnson has never averaged more than 10 points per game in a seven-season career with the Minnesota Timberwolves, the Lakers and now the Clippers. He averaged 2.7 points on 36.5 percent shooting last season.

So far, he looks like a different person, a more confident player, one worthy of a larger role.

“He’s been terrific,” Rivers said. “He’s making shots and he’s confident, and he just has to keep doing it. I told him that last year and the year before. He’s seeing the ball go in, so each time it goes in, you get more confidence. When he misses them, keep shooting them.”

In the previous seasons, he’s been a standout shooter in practice, “an 11 o’clock shooter,” as the coaches might say. Now, with the Clippers in need of reliable shooters from the perimeter, he’s displaying that remarkable touch during the games.

“We’ve been seeing that in practice for three years,” Rivers said. “We haven’t seen it in the games. Now, you guys (reporters) get to see it in the games. It’s nice for all of us. Wes, this summer worked the hardest that I’ve seen him, and I think it’s paying off for him.”

SHORTHANDED LINEUP

Rivers planned to rest Blake Griffin, DeAndre Jordan, Milos Teodosic and Lou Williams for the Clippers’ exhibition finale against the Lakers. Gallinari, Patrick Beverley (knee), Sam Dekker (oblique), Sindarius Thornwell (shoulder) and Jamil Wilson (back) sat out because of injuries.

Rivers said all but Beverley and Thornwell were expected back on the practice court Sunday, after the Clippers take Saturday as a day of rest. Rivers then amended his list to say Thornwell was a “maybe” and Austin Rivers and Dekker were “iffy.”

“We need the guards to be on the floor,” Rivers said.

IROEGBU SIGNS

The Clippers signed Ike Iroegbu, a guard from Washington State who is ticketed for their new developmental league team in Ontario. Iroegbu averaged 12.6 points, 4.2 rebounds and 3.6 assists in 34.2 minutes in 31 games as a senior with the Cougars.

CSO50 2018 winners demonstrate world-class security strategies

The CSO50 recognizes 50 security projects that demonstrate outstanding thought leadership and business value. 

To scale these security strategies throughout the security community, honorees will share case studies of their winning projects at the CSO50 Conference + Awards, being held February 26-28, 2018, at The Scottsdale Resort at McCormick Ranch in Scottsdale, Arizona. The conference will conclude with an awards ceremony to celebrate the CSO50 honoree organizations and their security leadership.

Join us in congratulating the 2018 CSO50 winners!

2018 CSO50 Award Honorees: 

  • Aetna
  • Albertsons Companies
  • Allstate Insurance Company
  • American Express
  • American Public Power Association
  • Arizona State University
  • Bank of the Ozarks
  • Bechtel
  • Bridgewater Associates, LP
  • Children’s Mercy Kansas Hospital
  • Cleveland Metropolitan School District
  • CLP Holdings Limited
  • Comcast Corporation
  • Cook County Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management
  • Cox Automotive
  • Delta Dental Plans Association
  • Ellie Mae
  • Fannie Mae
  • Finicity
  • Finning International
  • GE Aviation
  • Genpact
  • HBO Latin America
  • Health Management Systems
  • Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited
  • Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of NJ
  • Infosys Limited
  • innogy SE
  • Jackson Health System
  • Kimberly-Clark Corporation
  • Lennar
  • Lifespan
  • Merit Network
  • Micron Technology, Inc.
  • NorthShore University HealthSystem
  • Polaris Alpha
  • Premise Health
  • Prudential Financial
  • Rainforest Alliance
  • State of Michigan, Department of Technology, Management and Budget
  • State of Missouri, Office of Administration
  • Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association (TIAA)
  • The Clorox Company
  • The Home Depot
  • Tift Regional Health System
  • United Nations Development Programme
  • University of California
  • University of Pennsylvania
  • Xerox Corporation (recognized for 2 projects)

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5 Essential Email Marketing Statistics You Should Check Often

Email marketing is more than just sending out a message or two to your subscribers every week.

You’ve got to analyze data as well.

If you’re not checking the statistics, how do you measure the success of each campaign?

Look, I get it.

There are lots of numbers on the Internet, and you may not know where to start.

I’ll steer you in the right direction.

I can show you which statistics are important to check weekly.

Email yields a significantly higher return on investment than other direct marketing mediums do.

image2 5

Here’s what you need to do:

  1. Check your own data from each email marketing campaign.
  2. Compare this information to general email marketing trends.

Doing just one or the other isn’t enough.

You need to check both if you want to analyze the information effectively.

Why?

It’s always important to know how you are doing.

You may think you’re lacking in certain aspects of your strategy based on the campaign data.

In reality, however, you may be outperforming the industry standards.

It’s impossible to know this unless you compare statistics.

If you don’t, you could end up wasting time, money, and effort in an attempt to improve certain areas of your campaign that are more than satisfactory.

And you may end up neglecting the parts that actually need improvement.

These are the top 5 email marketing statistics you should check at least once a week.

1. Unsubscribe rates

You’ve got to see how many of your subscribers are opting out of your email list each week.

If these rates are high, you have to determine why your customers are unsubscribing from your messages.

image4 5

The above are the top reasons why consumers opt out of promotional emails.

Compare these reasons to those in your campaign.

Are you doing any of these things?

You have control over everything on this list.

Don’t spam your subscribers.

Emailing people too much is a huge turn off.

To prevent this, you can ask your customers how often they want to receive messages when they initially sign up.

Segment your customers based on their responses.

Do they want to receive a daily update, weekly newsletter, or monthly coupon?

Allow them to decide, and then you can avoid unsubscribes based on that top reason.

If the customer loses interest in your brand, that’s because you haven’t kept them engaged.

Ultimately this means you’re faltering in more than just your email campaigns.

You’ve got to stay relevant and avoid falling behind your competition.

Use competitor analysis tools to keep up with other players in your industry.

If your emails aren’t optimized for mobile devices, you are making an enormous mistake.

Mobile open rates are trending upward:

image3 5

More people open their emails on mobile devices than desktop computers.

You’ll lose subscribers if your email marketing campaigns are not optimized for mobile phones.

Check your unsubscribe rates every week.

Understanding these numbers can help you improve your campaign and retain subscribers.

2. Open rates

Okay, so you’ve spent some time crafting the perfect email message.

It’s got a ton of quality content. You can’t wait to send it out.

But here’s the problem.

Your message is useless if your subscribers don’t open it.

Checking your open rates each week needs to be a priority.

You can compare them to the average open rates in your industry.

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Aim to be better than average.

How can you increase your open rates?

Personalize your message.

If you have a personalized subject line, your email has a 22% greater chance of being opened than the one without it.

However, only 70% of businesses are personalizing their messages.

Why?

It could be for a couple of reasons:

  1. they don’t know how;
  2. they aren’t checking email marketing statistics on a weekly basis.

This is your time to shine.

Learning valuable information like this can help you increase your open rates, which can ultimately lead to more conversions.

Create a sense of urgency in the subject line.

image1 5

You can use the words on this graph as a reference while brainstorming the subject of each campaign.

Using a word like “important” can help increase your open rates.

There are other ways you can create a sense of urgency without using those trigger words in the subject line.

You can imply urgency with a timeline or expiration of something happening.

Here’s an example from JetBlue:

image13 2

It’s a highly effective strategy for getting higher open rates.

This subject line and message creates FOMO—the fear of missing out.

“The deal ends tonight.”

If the subscriber doesn’t open the message now, they will miss out on the deal that’s expiring in less than 24 hours.

Keep an eye on the number of subscribers opening emails from each campaign.

You can use some tips, like the example above, to increase your open rates.

Remember, your content may be great, but it’s useless if nobody is reading it.

Monitoring your open rates on a weekly basis is an absolute necessity.

3. Click-through rates

Once you get your subscribers to open your message, the next step is getting them to click.

Are they doing this?

Have you been tracking these statistics?

You should be.

Apparently, 15% of marketers do not track email clicks.

Only 23% of marketers track what happens after a subscriber clicks on an email message through integration analytics with their website and email software.

These numbers are very telling for a couple of reasons.

First, it seems like the majority of marketers understand the importance of tracking clicks.

Hopefully, you’re not in the bottom 15% who aren’t checking these numbers on a weekly basis.

If you are, that has to change immediately.

With that said, even though marketers understand the importance of clicks, less than 25% actually monitor what those clicks turn into on their websites.

How can you improve click-through rates?

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Give your subscribers a reason to click.

What’s the goal of your email marketing campaign?

Each message may have a different goal.

For example, one week your objective may be to increase the download rates of a free PDF e-book on your website.

Another goal may be to improve social media shares of your latest blog post.

For an ecommerce company, the primary goal would be to increase sales with each marketing campaign.

Regardless of your goal, it needs to be clearly established before you create and design your message.

Now, you can create a perfect call to action (CTA).

An effective CTA will improve your click-through rates (CTR).

The majority of businesses use CTR to measure the success of the email marketing campaigns:

image11 4

So, let’s take a step back for a second.

Obviously, you can’t measure the success of your CTR if you aren’t tracking it.

Making sure you check these statistics every week is the first step.

Now, let’s say these numbers are unsatisfactory or declining.

What can you do to improve this rate?

Create interactive emails.

Here’s an example.

Delta used real-time marketing to increase CTR by 132%.

How?

They gave their subscribers a reason to click within the message.

image8 5

This is a perfect example of how interactivity can increase clicks.

These clicks can ultimately increase sales as well.

It gives the customer a chance to click on a seat, which may be more expensive than their initial purchase.

But it’s so easy to do.

The subscriber doesn’t need to visit a website, enter their login information, search for their flight, and select a seat.

Instead, they can upgrade to a seat with extra legroom or a first class ticket with just one click.

Interactive emails can help you boost revenue through upselling in addition to improving CTR.

All of this can be accomplished by checking your click-through rate statistics each week.

4. Length of engagement

Your email marketing software may or may not track this information.

But it’s important you understand how long your subscribers stay engaged with each message.

Here’s an excellent visual representation of these statistics:

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What does this information tell you?

It looks like people have a short attention span.

If you send an email that’ll take 10 minutes to read, chances are it won’t get read.

That’s okay.

Use these engagement statistics to your advantage, and structure your campaigns accordingly.

Here’s an example from a blog post that I wrote.

image12 4

We can apply this method to your email strategy.

Let’s pretend the title is the subject line and the introduction is the message in the body of the email.

The goal of this campaign is to generate more views on this blog post.

We can generate curiosity with the email.

Don’t give out the answer right away.

I didn’t come out and say, “You should focus on SEO before PPC.”

In this case, the subscriber would have no reason to open the message.

They already know the answer.

Remember what we said earlier?

The average length of engagement is low. You only have seconds to capture the reader’s attention.

So the introduction to that blog post is perfect for the email message. It’s quick, and it still doesn’t give away the answer.

Now the subscriber is even more curious.

So they’ll click through to the blog.

Mission accomplished.

If you weren’t checking the recent statistics regarding the length of email engagement, you might not have known to apply this psychological tactic.

Stay up to date with this information on a weekly basis to see if there are any significant changes with the trend.

5. Bounce rates

Monitor your bounce rates.

Your email marketing software most likely has a feature that helps you determine the risk of a message getting filtered as spam.

Here’s an example of what it looks like on Constant Contact’s platform

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Make sure you check this before you send out your message.

If you have a high risk for getting filtered as spam, you’ll end up with a higher bounce rate.

Take a look back at your past campaigns to see what the bounce rates were.

If these statistics are high, it’s time to figure out what you’re doing wrong.

Here are some possibilities.

You might have invalid addresses on your email lists.

If that’s the case, it means your new subscriber rate is also thrown off.

Why are people entering an invalid email address?

Was it an honest mistake? Did they do this intentionally?

Look back at your subscriber acquisition strategy to analyze possible flaws in your system.

Emails could also bounce if the recipient:

  • has a full inbox
  • is on vacation with their auto-reply turned on
  • blocked your email address

Keep an eye on your bounce rate statistics each week.

If the numbers are too high, you’ll need to determine the problem.

Conclusion

You need to monitor email marketing statistics every week.

Compare your numbers to trends in the marketing industry so you can effectively measure your results.

This will help you determine how successful your campaigns are.

You’ve got to understand the tendencies of your subscribers, such as their mobile habits.

image10 5

Staying up to date on these numbers will make you a better marketer.

Here are some of the top email marketing statistics you need to check each week:

  • unsubscribe rates
  • open rates
  • click-through rates
  • length of engagement
  • bounce rates

If your unsubscribe rates and bounce rates are high, you’ve got a problem that needs to be addressed.

The only way to know whether you’re trending in the wrong direction is to check this data each week.

Even if your message gets delivered, it’s useless if the subscriber doesn’t open it.

Once it’s opened, you’ll need to make sure the recipient clicks on your call to action, leading to conversions.

Use some of the tactics I outlined in this post to increase open rates, lengthen engagement time, and improve click-through rates.

Which weekly email marketing statistic do you think is the most crucial to improving conversions in your business?

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Whicker: Dodgers in World Series: If not now, when?

As you’ve noticed, the Big Dodger In The Sky has been on sabbatical.

Last seen in the fall of 1988, the BDITS has left Dodgers fans (A) glumly watching someone else lift trophies and wear champagne goggles or (B) angrily bolting the sports bar, looking for the car and a Lakers schedule.

L.A. fans weren’t accustomed to this. The Dodgers won the World Series in their second year on the coast. They were legendary in the 1960s, powerful in the ’70s and inspirational in the ’80s, when they won their last two World Series.

But then they weren’t the Dodgers anymore. Renegade ownership, revolving managers, off-putting players, and yearly disappointment. Every team in the NL West has been to a World Series since the last time the Dodgers have, including the Diamondbacks and Rockies, who weren’t alive in 1988.

Now the BDITS is back and has loaded the deck.

The Dodgers arrive at the National League Championship Series in their most commanding position in years, even counting 1988. The teams will be roughly equal, but not their circumstances.

The Cubs and Nationals played in a cold Chicago rain Wednesday and then shipped to Washington on Thursday. The Cubs won a 4-hour, 38-minute clincher, 9-8, and will fly here on Friday and open the series Saturday. True, baseball players fly like Cabinet secretaries, but they also have body clocks like you and me. At some point adrenaline dissipates.

Chicago and Washington lost their off day because of Tuesday’s rainout. The same thing happened to the Dodgers last year. Game 2 in Washington was postponed because of mist and darkness (it never really rained), so they played Monday and then flew to L.A. for two games and back to Washington for Game 5 Thursday, which Clayton Kershaw saved for Kenley Jansen, sometime after midnight.

The Dodgers partied hard, then remembered they had Game 1 in Chicago Saturday. Kenta Maeda was the starter-by-necessity, and then Kershaw won Sunday, and the Dodgers even won Game 3 on Tuesday to lead, 2-1.

But then the fog arrived, and they blundered their way out of the series, losing Games 4-5-6 by a total score of 23-6.

The Cubs’ pitching was set. Now it is not. Kyle Hendricks won’t work until Game 3 in Chicago on Tuesday. Luis Quintana would have worked Game 1 but was thrown into the chaos of Game 5. The choice is probably John Lackey, although manager Joe Maddon really has no choice. And closer Wade Davis had to get the final seven outs Thursday.

The Dodgers’ Dave Roberts will use his starters when he wants to, not when he has to. It could be Rich Hill in Game 2 after Kershaw or it could be Yu Darvish. But Roberts will not be cornered into using Kershaw’ on three days’ rest this time.

Last year the tires were wobbling on setup reliever Joe Blanton, who had been brilliant all season. He had nothing left for the Cubs and suffered two losses with seven runs in three innings.

This year Pedro Baez has backslid, but the Dodgers have choices, including three lefties if they activate Luis Avilan. None of them need rest. If anything, they need work. With off-days Monday and Friday, Kenley Jansen can begin his work in the eighth. If the starter gets 15 to 18 outs and Jansen gets four to six, Roberts will have more applicants than jobs available. That is rare in October.

Plus, these Dodgers are just different.

Cody Bellinger was in the Arizona Fall League 12 months ago. Chris Taylor wasn’t even a thought.

Julio Urias, at 19, started Game 4 last year. Maeda started twice. Andrew Toles was the starting left fielder and kicked off Game 6 by botching a fly ball.

Yasiel Puig was benched for Game 6 against Hendricks. That isn’t happening again. Joc Pederson and Yasmani Grandal were automatics. Now Pederson didn’t make the 25-man NLDS roster, and Grandal and Austin Barnes are splitting time.

And Darvish, or at least the Darvish who silenced Arizona for five innings, is a massive rotation upgrade.

Alex Wood pitched the final inning of the ’16 Dodgers season in hopeless relief. Now he’s 16-3 with a 2.82 ERA and he hasn’t started since Sept. 26.

The 1988 Dodgers were far worse off. In losing 10 of 11 to the Mets in the regular season they were outscored, 49-18.

Writers were wondering if Cooperstown should waive all rules and induct the entire Mets’ roster en masse.

But something in the sky, maybe Mike Scisocia’s Game 4 home run, changed all that.

If this Dodger team doesn’t win this series, you might consider losing your religion.

BrandPost: Food Services Giant Moves Securely to the Cloud Over a Single Weekend

When one of the world’s largest food services companies needed a better way to connect its vast distributed network of operations, it turned to Microsoft Azure and Fortinet to “move the entire organization to Azure on a single weekend morning: no issues, no downtime, no fuss!” 

The company is a top 5 global food services company that provides food and beverage services for schools, hospitals, and major public venues in dozens of countries. They turned to Fortinet’s suite of virtualized security solutions, including FortiGate, after replacing the hosted VPN service they had been using to securely connect their many sites. 

That hosted VPN service “did exactly what we needed it to do, but it just cost far too much,” said a long-time network architect for the company. 

The company then began to consider the Microsoft Azure cloud service as an alternative. But Microsoft Azure has limitations on the number of VPN tunnels it allows, which can be a show-stopper for a large company operating across the globe. “It appeared to be a great fit for our requirements, right up to the point when I realized we couldn’t connect all the countries!”, the network architect said. 

The food services company already had experience with Fortinet because it had deployed a series of FortiGate appliances to supplement the security measures used by the original VPN service. The company was impressed with the capabilities of Fortinet’s security solutions, and their IT team soon realized that Fortinet “was the perfect answer to our issue with Azure tunnel restrictions,” the network architect continued. 

Even the smallest FortiGate appliance can support hundreds of tunnels, with larger models supporting thousands. This flexibility allowed the food services provider to configure a dedicated tunnel into the appliances deployed in each country where it operates. The combined traffic was then routed into a single connection with Azure and linked to the virtualized Fortinet security services. 

“The FortiGate gave us a very simple, yet elegant solution and had the benefit of enabling us to continue leveraging all the security features and functionality that we previously utilized in the hosted-service environment,” the network architect said. 

In addition to the security benefits, the Fortinet family of physical and virtual solutions are fully integrated through a common operating system, allowing the company to expand into the cloud, while its cross-compatibility actually simplified its IT infrastructure. The company’s business model encourages country-level autonomy to optimize operations for local conditions. That autonomy allows operations in each country to make their own IT purchasing decisions, including the security products they use. Fortunately, Fortinet solutions were able to make these deployments work as an integrated security system. 

“We seemed to have firewalls from every vendor imaginable, including some very obscure brands,” the architect explained. “The great thing is that the FortiGate can talk to anything; even firewalls that most people have never even heard of! I’ve yet to come across a single box that I can’t get the FortiGate to connect with.” 

Fortinet’s Security Fabric is designed to share intelligence with diverse devices across the company’s widespread environment, enabling control and easy management of cybersecurity services across the company. They also help the food services company manage its Microsoft Azure service. While Azure offers a wide set of tools to monitor and manage their deployments, additional tweaks are sometimes needed to fully optimize the service. 

“I really depend on the information provided by my FortiGate devices,” the network architect said. “They give me the granularity I need to see and drill down in order to debug anything I need to. It’s a very efficient way to manage the whole infrastructure.” 

He also praised the FortiGate interface, calling it “exceptionally intuitive.” “Its functions are so well integrated that I’m comfortable using the command line interface to make modifications from anywhere in the world,” he added. 

“I’ve seen so many other devices where even after lengthy examination of the configurations, it’s really hard to unravel what’s actually going on. Many give the impression that they’re made from two or three separate boxes – like an ISP router and firewall slapped together with a bit of UTM functionality thrown on top – all randomly bolted together. That approach is rarely if ever good enough.”

Fortinet is the veteran network architect’s first choice for enterprise protection. And now, the pairing of Azure and the Fortinet Security Fabric has eased the company’s transition to a cloud environment. 

 “Azure is definitely the right platform for us, but the size and complexity of our operations nearly made it a nonstarter,” he concluded. “By adding Fortinet’s easily integrated physical and virtualized solutions, we’ve been able to provide each entity with a dedicated tunnel, enhance security, and dramatically improve visibility and control across the whole infrastructure.” 

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College football Week 7 in the L.A. TV market: USC should apparently be thankful it’s not on Pac-12 Net like UCLA is this weekend

Maybe you recall last week how Washington Huskies head coach Chris Petersen threw some shade on the abundance of light-night games his team has had to play — including two 7:45 p.m. kickoffs on ESPN on consecutive Saturdays.

Maybe you missed Kirk Herbstreit on last week’s “College GameDay” trying to shed some light in an ESPN-esque sort of way.

“The reality is, as an advocate on this show for the Pac-12 for the last 20 years, wanting to try to bring as much exposure to that conference as we can, you should be thanking ESPN for actually having a relationship thanks to Larry Scott with the Pac-12 because your games are seen.

“Before, there was a black hole when it came to the Pac-12 and now, you can actually tune into the Pac-12 and see them if you live in the ACC or the SEC or the Big Ten. So I understand (Petersen’s) point — but be careful. Would you rather be on at 3:30 on the Pac-12 Network eastern when nobody’s watching?”

That does it. We demand Washington now play a game on Thanksgiving Day. At 7:45 p.m. And they must appreciate it as they knock the stuffing out of (pick a sub-par Pac-12 opponent).

Trashing/debating the Pac-12 “After Dark” campaign isn’t anything new, or newsworthy, until the discussion gets ugly. We’re tried to explain how this all works before, when UCLA seemed to get stuck with an array of late-night appearances.

The reality is, every conference benefits with ESPN exposure. And Fox. And even, to some degree, Pac-12 Net. And the conference benefits from the ESPN and Fox rights fees.

What Herbstreit said is 100 percent right, and 100 percent wrong in the way he framed it.

Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott, who went on at halftime of last Saturday night’s Washington-Cal game, called Herbstreit’s comments “unfortunate.” ESPN eventually put up a graphic — a graphic — during the game to dispute the claim that late-night games don’t draw better ratings.

When USC plays Utah at 5 p.m. Saturday, on the prime-time nationally televised game to the nation, the Pac-12 benefits, but not as fortunately as they’d have hoped. Neither USC nor Utah is unbeaten as they were when this was decided, so the ABC A-team has bailed out.

Meanwhile, for the conference to really capture as many benefits as possible, Washington must keep winning out, including its final regular-season game against ranked Washington State, against (perhaps) USC in the Pac-12 Conference game, and then hope things break so it belongs in the Final Four.

So … about this USC-Utah game …

If things broke right, Herbstreit and his “College GameDay” group could have made things easy on themselves and showed up at the USC campus this Saturday morning, then waited around for the kickoff.

Maybe since this game lost some bounce when both teams posted a loss over the last two weeks and fell in the Top 25, and there wasn’t any other game worthy of “GameDay” beckoning, ESPN decided to send its high-profile Saturday morning pregame show/celebration to James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va.

James Madison (5-0) is the top-ranked team in the FBC/non-FBS division and has a game against Villanova. Oh, and the Herbstreit-Chris Fowler team has been reassigned.

As the Richmond Times-Dispatch points out, ESPN vice president of college sports and the former coordinating producer of “College GameDay” Lee Fitting is a 1996 graduate of JMU.

How fitting.

As a result, “GameDay” will not likely make a SoCal visit the rest of this year. It has already been to Indiana, Ohio State, Louisville, Virginia Tech and, last week, Texas Christian, as well as to Times Square in New York and Atlanta for the Alabama-Florida kickoff game.

Not that anyone’s paying attention.

Meanwhile, this is how Saturday plays out:

THE LOCALS:
= USC vs. Utah, at the Coliseum, Saturday at 5 p.m., Channel 7 (Steve Levy, Brian Griese and Todd McShay)
= UCLA at Arizona, Saturday at 6 p.m., Pac-12 Network (Roxy Bernstein, Anthony Herron, Lewis Johnson)

THE PAC-12:
= Washington State at Cal, Friday at 7:30 p.m., ESPN (Adam Amin, Dusty Dvoracek, Molly McGrath)
= Colorado at Oregon State, Saturday at 1 p.m. Pac-12 Net (Ted Robinson, Yogi Roth, Jill Savage)
= Washington at Arizona State, Saturday at 7:45 p.m., ESPN (Dave Pasch, Greg McElroy, Tom Luginbill)
= Oregon at Stanford, Saturday at 8 p.m., FS1 (Tim Brando, Spencer Tillman, Holly Sonders)

BEST OF THE REST:
Friday:
= Clemson at Syracuse, 4 p.m., ESPN (Dave Lamont, Mack Brown)
Saturday:
= Texas Christian at Kansas State, 9 a.m., FS1 (Joe Davis, Brady Quinn, Bruce Feldman)
= Michigan at Indiana, 9 a.m., Channel 7 (Bob Wischusen, Brock Huard)
= Texas Tech at West Virginia, 9 a.m., ESPNU (Mike Couzens, John Congemi)
= Florida State at Duke, 9 a.m., ESPN2 (Jason Benetti, Kelly Stouffer)
= South Carolina at Tennessee, 9 a.m., ESPN (Mike Patrick, Tommy Tuberville)
= BYU at Mississippi State, 9 a.m., SEC Network (David Neal, Matt Stinchcomb)
= Purdue at Wisconsin, 12:30 p.m., Big Ten Network (Kevin Kugler, Matt Millen)
= Auburn at LSU, 12:30 p.m., Channel 2 (Brad Nessler, Gary Danielson)
= Georgia Tech at Miami, 12:30 p.m., Channel 7 (Mark Jones, Rod Gilmore, Quint Kessinich)
= Oklahoma vs. Texas at Dallas, 12:30 p.m., ESPN (Joe Tessitore, Todd Blackledge, Holly Rowe)
= Baylor at Oklahoma State, 12:30 p.m., FS1 (Justin Kutcher, Mark Helfrich and Petros Papadakis)
= Texas A&M at Florida, 4 p.m., ESPN2 (Beth Mowins, Anthony Becht)
= Arkansas at Alabama, 4:15 p.m., ESPN (Chris Fowler, Kirk Herbstreit, Maria Taylor)
= Missouri at Georgia, 4:30 p.m., SEC Net (Tom Hart, Jordan Rodgers)
= Ohio State at Nebraska, 4:30 p.m., FS1 (Gus Johnson, Joel Klatt, Jenny Taft)
= Michigan State at Minnesota, 5 p.m., Big Ten Net (Brandon Gaudin, Glen Mason)
= Boise State at San Diego State, 7:30 p.m., CBSSN (Carter Blackburn, Aaron Taylor, Jenny Taft)